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Showing posts from August, 2019

New Tool shows Elevations on Google Maps, all over the world

With the new Elevation on Google Maps tool, you can find the elevation of any place worldwide.

Use the "Search places" box to type an address, city or other place, and see it's approximate elevation, or just explore by clicking around the map.  In addition to elevation, the tool will also display other information about your chosen location, such as city, county, state, country and latitude/longitude.

Here's an example showing the historic center of Mexico City at about 7,359 feet:

Elevation on Google Maps tool showing Elevation of Mexico City


Want to see an elevation profile along your path or route?

Just click the blue "Elevation Profile..." button on the left side of the map.  Then, slowly draw the path by clicking along your desired route, then click "Stop Drawing" when you're done. (You can also just draw a straight line if you want to see the elevation profile across a whole state, for example).  Here's an Elevation Profile across Colorado:
Elevation on Google Maps tool showing Elevation Profile across Colorado

Want to use the metric system?  You can also change the units from feet/miles to meters/kilometers by clicking the "Use m/km" button.

One more cool feature:  Ever been curious about other places that are the same elevation?  For instance, if I search for Madrid and check the "Show similar elevations" (then zoom the map out), I get a map showing a set of contour lines representing all the places within +/- 50ft elevation (or +/- 50m):

Elevation on Google Maps tool showing similar elevations to Madrid
 
If you're any kind of card-carrying map geek like me, you'll find that feature pretty fun to play with! ;)

For a more complete understanding of the capabilities, be sure and read the QUICK TIPS and the COVERAGE NOTES below the Elevation on Google Maps tool.

Please feel free to share this tool with your friends, and leave any comments below!

Enjoy!

Create a custom County Lines map or ZIP Code-based Sales/Service/Delivery Territory map on the fly -- overlaid on Google Maps

I've had requests from several people to add the capability to create links on their website that would open up the County Lines on Google Maps tool already focused on their region of interest.
Several have also wondered if there is a way to create a ZIP Code-based Sales/Service/Delivery Territory map on the fly.

Now you can!  Here's how it works:

Create a map zoomed to a State and show County Name labels

To simply zoom to a state and optionally show county name labels and a map title, create a link such as this:

https://www.randymajors.com/p/countygmap.html?state=CT&labels=show
TIP: copy/paste the links below and customize to suit your needs

The parameters you can use are as follows:
  • state - expects a 2-character state code as used by the USPS, for example, ?state=CT
  • onestate - optionally shows ONLY the counties in the state specified by the state parameter by using the word show, as in, &onestate=show (in other words, this will hide the county boundaries that are outside of your state of interest)
  • title - optionally give your map a title (use the + character to represent spaces), for example, &title=Connecticut+Counties
  • labels - optionally shows county labels by using the word show, as in, &labels=show
  • color - optionally choose the color used for the Map Title, expects a 6-character hex color code without the leading # character, for example, &color=00FF00 would create a green map title (free tools are widely available on the internet to find your hex color)

Create a map zoomed to ZIP Code(s) and optionally show the ZIP Code Boundaries and add a Title

To zoom to one or multiple ZIP Codes, and optionally show their boundary (e.g. for a service territory, sales territory or delivery area), create a link such as this:

https://www.randymajors.com/p/countygmap.html?zips=10023,10024,10025,10026&zipboundary=show&title=My+Service+Territory
TIP: copy/paste the links below and customize to suit your needs

The parameters you can use are as follows:
      • zips - expects a comma-separated list of one or multiple 5-digit U.S. ZIP Code(s) (do not use spaces between the commas), for example, ?zips=10023,10024
      • zipboundary - optionally shows a merged overall boundary based on the zips (e.g. for a service territory or delivery area) by using the word show, as in, &zipboundary=show 
      • title - optionally give your map a title (use the + character to represent spaces), for example, &title=My+Sales+Territory
      • color - optionally choose the color used for the Map Title and the ZIP boundary, expects a 6-character hex color code without the leading # character, for example, &color=00FF00 would create a green map title and ZIP boundary (free tools are widely available on the internet to find your hex color)
      • labels - optionally shows county labels by using the word show, as in, &labels=show

      Maps created from the above two examples

      The first example links you to a County Lines map centered on Connecticut, showing you the county lines and labeling the names of the counties on the map:
      Google Maps with County Boundaries example from Connecticut including county name labels


      The second example creates a Service Territory Map based on a list of ZIP Codes (10023,10024,10025,10026) and creates a title for the map:
      Create a custom County Lines map or ZIP Code-based Sales/Service/Delivery Territory map on the fly, overlaid on Google Maps


      A few important things to make this work:

      1.  You must use the question mark ( ? ) right after .html, as shown above and below
      2.  Do NOT use spaces anywhere in the URL or query parameters
      3.  You must separate query parameters using the ampersand ( & ), as shown above and below
      4.  User the + character to represent spaces in the title parameter

      TIP:  For simplicity, you can drop the https://www from the front and just create the link as:

      With this functionality, you can feel free to create links on your own website that open a window to the County Lines on Google Maps tool, already zoomed into your area of interest OR showing a ZIP Code based sales territory, service territory or delivery area!

      Feel free to share this with others who may find this functionality useful!


      NOTE:  The above article relates to PRESENT-day County Lines.  Here are the instructions for linking to HISTORICAL County Lines.

      How to link to an HISTORICAL County Lines map for any Year and Geographic Area of Interest -- overlaid on Google Maps

      NOTE:  This article relates to HISTORICAL County Lines.  Here are the instructions for linking to PRESENT-day County Lines.

      If you have a website or blog and want to create a link to an HISTORICAL county lines map for ANY YEAR and ANY US STATE,  this article is for you!

      Using the instructions below, you can create a link to Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps for any historical year already zoomed into a particular State, and optionally display the labels showing the county names as of that historical year.

      Here's how it works:   

      To create a map zoomed into a state for a given year, create a link such as this:
      https://www.randymajors.com/p/maps.html?state=CT&year=1788

      To create a map zoomed into a state for a given year, and show county name labels, create a link such as this:
      https://www.randymajors.com/p/maps.html?state=OR&year=1865&labels=show
        TIP: copy/paste the above links and customize to suit your needs

        To explain the above example links, there are three words (called "query parameters") you can use to create a link.  Note, they must be specified in the order shown. 
        • state - expects a 2-character state code as used by the USPS, for example, ?state=CT
        • year - expects a 4-digit historical year, from 1629 through 2000, for example, ?year=1788
        • labels - optionally shows county labels by using the word show, for example, &labels=show

        Here are the maps produced by the two examples above

        The first example links you to an Historical U.S. County Lines map centered on Connecticut, showing you the county boundaries as of 1788:
        Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps example from 1788 Connecticut

        The second example links you to an Historical U.S. County Lines map centered on Oregon, showing you the county lines as of 1865 and labeling the names of the counties on the map:
        Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps example from 1865 Oregon with county name labels

        A few important things to make this work:

        1.  You must use the question mark ( ? ) right after .html, as shown above and below
        2.  You must separate query parameters using the ampersand ( & ), as shown above and below
        3.  You must specify the query parameters in order: state, year and optionally labels

        TIP:  For simplicity, you can drop the https://www from the front and just create the link as:


        With this functionality, you can feel free to create links on your own website that open a window to the Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps tool, already zoomed into your area of interest and showing county boundaries as of the year you're interest in!

        Share this with others who may find this functionality useful!