Have you tried AncestorSearch on Google Search for searching for ancestors (or living people) lately?

QUICK LINK TO THE TOOL:  AncestorSearch on Google Search

For a change, this post focuses on Google Search rather than the Google Maps tools on this website.

If you've tried searching for a mention of your ancestors (or living people) using Google Search, you've no doubt run into this little issue from time to time:
Google Search returns too many results


175 MILLION results?  OK, this might take a while...




Enter AncestorSearch on Google Search, a free search tool that uses Google search enhancements so that you are much more likely to find mentions of the ancestors (or living people) you're looking for that are otherwise buried in thousands of Google search results.  Basically, it uses Google advanced search operators behind the scenes so you don't have to spend time typing a bunch of awkward symbols.

An example is probably the easiest way to illustrate how AncestorSearch works.  Let's say I am looking for mention of a marriage of a couple of ancestors.  I might type something like this into Google Search:
OK, only 2,030 results to start to wade through ;)  But as I look through the first page of results, none of them pertain to my ancestors.

So instead, let's do the same search on AncestorSearch on Google Search:

In the above example, I've just typed in the names and locations into the appropriate boxes, then clicked the "Run Full Google Search" button in the lower right corner.  Another browser tab opens with the search results:

ONE result!  Nice.  And when I click the search result, it happens to been an archive page showing a full biography of my ancestors.  (You'll often get more than one result, but it will typically be a very manageable number)

So how does the AncestorSearch tool do this?  In short, Google advanced search operators.  The AncestorSearch tool doesn't do anything magical, but it's a big time saver over typing out all of those quotation marks, reverse name order, pipes and so on.  In the above example, this is the search string that the AncestorSearch sends to Google Search:

"adam smith"|"smith, adam" "caroline meinzer"|"meinzer, caroline"|"caroline meincer"|"meincer, caroline" "stephenson " marriage|married|marriages|wedding|wed|nuptial|nuptials|marry|intention 1860|1861|1862|1863|1864

Now, you can type all of that out manually into Google Search if you really want to...

Give AncestorSearch a try on your ancestors or on living people you're trying to find record of.  For example, Peter Calver, founder of LostCousins, stated in his newsletter "the first time I tried it, it led me to a new 'lost cousin'".

Here are some quick time-saving tips when using AncestorSearch:
  • Use the Tab key to move between input boxes
  • Use the Enter key when you're ready to perform the Google Search
  • Don't worry about upper case or lower case; Google Search is not case-sensitive
  • After you've searched, if you have too many or two few results, just close the browser tab that shows the search results, and make changes in AncestorSearch tab and try again
  • All of the boxes are optional, fill in as many or as few as you want
And here are a few power user tips:
  • If you have too many results, you can narrow the results by checking "Exact" for the year, or checking any of the Marriage, Births or Deaths checkboxes
  • If you're using a county name in the "Place" box, be sure and check that you're using the correct county name for the year you are searching by using this tool:  Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps (I find it's best to try searching both with the current county name and then again with the historical county name, as there is a lot of inconsistency in how historical place names get recorded)
  • If you know that your ancestor's name is often misspelled, just add the alternate spelling in the "Alternate Last Name" box.
  • The AncestorSearch tool has recently been optimized so you can more easily use it on your smartphone as well!  
And finally, here are a few pro-power user tips:
    • Another way to narrow your results further is to check the "Only return search results where persons' names are within 10 words of each other" checkbox at the bottom of the tool (it does what it says on the tin)
    • If you are getting inundated with search results from the major people finder websites, check "Exclude search results from the major people finder search tools" to skip searching those sites
    • Use the "Other search terms" input box at the bottom of the form to add an additional search term, or to ONLY search one website by typing site:wikipedia.org or to EXCLUDE search results from a particular website by typing -site:wikipedia.org
    • Multiple terms can be used in the "Other search terms" input box to add Google advanced search strings to your search, such as this (typed exactly as shown here):
      -site:wikipedia.com -"colorado springs" -denver
      This example excludes search results from wikipedia.com and excludes search results that contain the phrase "colorado springs" and excludes search results that contain the word denver
    • You can "pretend" the last name boxes are first name boxes and vice versa if you want to type alternate spellings of a first name.  The tool doesn't care which is the first and which is the last name.
    • After clicking the "Run Full Google Search" button, you can edit the search string on the Google Search page that appears, or just close that tab to go back and refine your search 

    Did you make any new finds with AncestorSearch?  Please share them in the comments section below!

       

    Comments

    1. What a great tool! Thanks for writing this article regarding Ancestor Search.
      May I have your permission to share it in a genealogy newsletter? I'm the editor for the Family History Society of Arizona. Of course, I would give you credit and link back to your site.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Jessie, thanks so much! I’m happy to give my permission. Hope it can be of use to your readers!

        Delete
      2. Hello Randy, I would also like to use your article on our blog. I am the editor for the South King County Genealogical Society (Washington state) blog page and would happily give you credit and link back to your site.

        Delete
      3. Hi MaryLynn, I'd be happy for you to make use of the article on your blog. Thank you.

        Delete
    2. Within 30 minutes I was able to find a 2017 obituary in Australia that seemed non-existent for two years. Found it in an obscure .pdf newsletter .. Amazing. I was also able to locate the death of a family member from England born 1910 and who seemed to just "disappear". I was able to locate his year of death and place of burial. This search tool is simply the best !

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Nikkei, congratulations on your finds!! And thanks so much for the kind words. I'm really glad you're finding it helpful!

        Delete
    3. Thanks, still no break thru on my Joseph Detwiler. . Married Mary Ann Singer
      I have their kids, and all info, but cant figure his father. Even youngest said he had no knowledge of his g parents.
      One day I hope to prove this line

      Thanks for all ive done to help

      Jane Detweiler Brockhausen

      ReplyDelete
    4. I would dearly love to try this, but I can't get to your AncestorSearch tool. When I try "AncestorSearch" (and several variations) and even "AncestorSearch on Google Search", I end up with all kinds of links to genealogical sites (even a link to this post) but not the "AncestorSearch on Google Search" with the "Subscribe" button further on. Can you give me advanced tips? (I confess to being not the most computer savvy of people, but then, few people in my generation are!)

      Thanks for any help you can give me!

      Patricia

      ReplyDelete
    5. United Kingdom searches would be beneficial.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi, AncestorSearch is not country-specific, so it should work anywhere that Google works. One caveat is that is will work slightly better for English speaking that non-English speaking countries.

        Delete
    6. I am amazed at what this search uncovers! Thank you very much!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I love hearing that it helps uncover stuff! Exactly what I was aiming (hoping) for. Thank you!

        Delete
    7. It works TOO well! The 3 results I got were all my own research. I'm going to try some other names. Maybe, maybe, maybe ;-)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hah! I know what you mean :) I sometimes think I’m making a new discovery just to realize it was mine from years ago and I’m “re-finding” it. Good luck on your searches. Hope it helps!

        Delete

    Post a Comment

    Recent Popular Posts

    Here's how you can see all County Lines on Google Maps

    Overlay present-day county lines on the Historical U.S. Counties on Google Maps tool